WATCH: Shameful Moment Dem Sen Says “Hell No,” Gives Thumbs Down During ACB Vote

WATCH: Shameful Moment Dem Sen Says “Hell No,” Gives Thumbs Down During ACB Vote


The same Democrat Senator who asked Amy Coney Barrett—the Catholic mother of seven—if she ever sexually assaulted someone, sank to new lows during last night’s Senate confirmation vote of the now-Supreme Court Justice.

As the Senators voted to confirm Barrett, Mazie Hirono (D-HI) walked up to the table on the Senate floor and gave a thumbs down motion and said, “hell no.”

Earlier this month at the Senate confirmation hearing, Hirono embarrassed herself when she asked Barrett if she had ever committed sexual assault.

Hirono began her questioning by citing a 2017 interview with Chief Justice John Roberts where he stated the judiciary is “not immune” from issues of sexual assault.

The senator said to “ensure the fitness” for any nominee to a lifetime appointment, she asks each appointee two questions.

“Since you became a legal adult, have you ever made unwanted requests for sexual favors, or committed any physical or verbal harassment or assault of a sexual nature?” Hirono asked.

“No, Senator Hirono,” Barrett responded.

“Have you ever faced discipline or entered into a settlement related to this kind of conduct?” Hirono then asked.

“No, Senator,” Barrett said.

If the ACB confirmation process has taught us anything, it’s that you can always count on Democrats to throw tantrums and act disrespectfully and unprofessionally when they don’t get their way.

WATCH: Insane Moment Dem Senator Asks Amy Coney Barrett if She Ever Sexually Assaulted Someone


Just when you thought today’s Senate questioning of Amy Coney Barrett by Democrats couldn’t get any more ridiculous, Hawaii Sen. Mazie Hirono actually asked the Supreme Court nominee—a Catholic mother of seven children—if she ever sexually assaulted someone.

Hirono began her ludicrous questions by citing a 2017 interview with Chief Justice John Roberts where he stated the judiciary is “not immune” from issues of sexual assault.

The senator said to “ensure the fitness” for any nominee to a lifetime appointment, she asks each appointee two questions.
“Since you became a legal adult, have you ever made unwanted requests for sexual favors, or committed any physical or verbal harassment or assault of a sexual nature?” Hirono asked.

“No, Senator Hirono,” Barrett responded.

“Have you ever faced discipline or entered into a settlement related to this kind of conduct?” Hirono then asked.
“No, Senator,” Barrett said.

The Daily Caller points out that Hirono previously announced in 2018 that she would ask all Supreme Court nominees these questions.
In a January 2018 tweet, Hirono wrote, “Starting today, I’m asking nominees to our courts, under oath, whether or not they have a history of sexual assault or harassment. Like in other industries, our judges are in positions of power & #TimesUp.”

I wonder if Sen. Hirono would ever ask these questions of the notoriously “handsy” Vice President Joe Biden?

Amy Coney Barrett Sworn in to the Supreme Court!


Just over an hour after the vote, Amy Coney Barrett was sworn in at a ceremony at the White House where the constitutional oath was given by Justice Clarence Thomas.

Barrett will be able to start her new role after Chief Justice John Roberts administers her Judicial Oath on Tuesday.

As reported in a Fox News article, Barrett was quoted from the ceremony:

“It is the job of a senator to pursue her policy preferences,” Barrett said to an audience on the South Lawn of the White House. “In fact, it would be a dereliction of duty for her to put policy goals aside. By contrast, it is the job of a judge to resist her policy preferences. It would be a dereliction of duty for her to give into them. Federal judges don’t stand for election. Thus, they have no basis for claiming that their preferences reflect those of the people.”

“This separation of duty from political preference is what makes the judiciary distinct among the three branches of government. A judge declares independence not only from Congress and the president, but also from the private beliefs that might otherwise move her,” she added.

“The judicial oath captures the essence of the judicial duty. The rule of law must always control. My fellow Americans, even though we judges don’t face elections, we still work for you. It is your Constitution that establishes the rule of law and the judicial Independence that is so central to it. The oath that I have solemnly taken tonight means at its core that I will do my job without any fear or favor, and that I will do so independently of both the political branches and of my own preferences. I love the Constitution and the democratic republic that it establishes, and I will devote myself to preserving it.”

Unfortunately before the ceremony was even over, we were given the true feelings of how members of the squad would like to handle the courts.


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