New York Times’ B.S. 1619 Project Named to “Top Ten Works of Journalism of the Decade”

The New York Times’ anti-American, revisionist history project, known as the “1619 Project” has been named to the “Top Ten Works of Journalism of the Decade”

New York Times’ B.S. 1619 Project Named to “Top Ten Works of Journalism of the Decade”

The New York Times’ anti-American, revisionist history project, known as the “1619 Project” has been named to the “Top Ten Works of Journalism of the Decade”


The New York Times’ anti-American, revisionist history project, known as the “1619 Project” has been named to the “Top Ten Works of Journalism of the Decade” by New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute.

The “1619 Project,” wrongly claimed the United States was founded in 1619—the year that slaves arrived in Jamestown, Virginia—instead of 1776 when the nation officially declared its independence. The project also claimed the American Revolution was fought to preserve slavery.

Breitbart writes:
The project’s lead essay, by Nikole Hannah-Jones, won the Pulitzer Prize even though its claim about the Revolution and slavery was regarded even by left-wing scholars as false, forcing the Times to make corrections and add an editor’s note.

Hannah-Jones later tried to claim the purpose of the “1619 Project” was not, in fact, to claim that America’s true founding was the arrival of slavery. Ironically, that appears to be what earned her a place on New York University’s top ten list.

On October 6, 21 members of the National Association of Scholars urged the Pulitzer Prize Board to revoke its award to Hannah-Jones:

We call on the Pulitzer Prize Board to rescind the 2020 Prize for Commentary awarded to Nikole Hannah-Jones for her lead essay in “The 1619 Project.” That essay was entitled, “Our democracy’s founding ideals were false when they were written.” But it turns out the article itself was false when written, making a large claim that protecting the institution of slavery was a primary motive for the American Revolution, a claim for which there is simply no evidence.

A WHOPPING 56% of Americans Say They are Better off Today (Mid-Pandemic) than Under Obama-Biden

Gallup's most recent survey found a majority of voters said they are better off now than they were four years ago, while 32% said they are worse off


A recent Gallup survey found that a whopping 56 percent of Americans say they are better off now under President Trump–in the middle of a pandemic–than they were four years ago when President Obama was in office.

Gallup writes:

During his presidential campaign in 1980, Ronald Reagan asked Americans, “Are you better off today than you were four years ago?” Since then, this question has served as a key standard that sitting presidents running for reelection have been held to.

Gallup’s most recent survey found a clear majority of registered voters (56%) saying they are better off now than they were four years ago, while 32% said they are worse off.

Gallup compared the 56 percent number to 2012, during the Obama-Biden Administration when just 45 percent of Americans could say they felt they were better off. In 2004, 47 percent of Americans said they were better off and in 1992, that number was at 38 percent.

President Trump responded to the news, writing on Twitter, “The Gallup Poll has just come out with the incredible finding that 56% of you say that you are better off today, during a pandemic, than you were four years ago (Biden). The highest number on record! Pretty amazing!”

BIDEN: 56 Percent of Americans “Probably Shouldn’t” Vote for Me

The hilarious comment was made when asked his opinion of a survey that found that 56% of Americans said they were better off now than 4 years ago


Vice President Joe Biden said that Americans who say they are better off now, under President Trump than they were four years ago under the Obama Administration, shouldn’t vote for him.

The hilarious comment was made when he was asked his opinion of a recent survey that found that 56 percent of Americans said they were better off now than four years ago.

Biden was asked, “Gallup reported last week 56 percent of Americans said they were better off today than they were 4 years ago, [that] would have been under the Obama-Biden administration. So why should people who feel they are better off today under the Trump administration vote for you?”

Biden replied, Well, if they think that, they probably shouldn’t.”

He then incorrectly stated the percentage that was just referenced to him and said, “They think — 54 percent of the American people believe they’re better off economically today than they were under our administration? Well, their memory is not very good, quite frankly.”

 

Last week we reported on the news of the Gallup poll which found just 32 percent of Americans said they were worse off now than under the Obama Administration.

These numbers are particularly astounding considering the United States is in the middle of a pandemic.

This wasn’t Biden’s only gaffe this week. In a surprising twist, he actually took questions from reporters yesterday (only briefly, of course) and forgot Sen. Mitt Romney’s name.

When asked about judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court and whether or not her faith should be factored into consideration, Biden said, “You may remember, I got in trouble when we were running against the senator who was a Mormon, the governor, OK? And I took him on. No one’s faith should be questioned.”

 

Later on that day during his speech, Biden also said he was running for the U.S. Senate: “You know, we have to come together. That’s why I’m running. I’m running as a proud Democrat for the Senate,” he said. “When I ran as a proud Democrat for vice president, and I’m running as a proud Democrat for president. But I promise you this, I will govern as an American president.”

 


Join the Newsletter