Like a Boss: Trump Nominates ACB’s Replacement for Seventh Circuit Seat

Like a Boss: Trump Nominates ACB’s Replacement for Seventh Circuit Seat


President Trump has already named a replacement for Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s seat on the Seventh Circuit in anticipation of her confirmation to the Supreme Court.

The White House announced Wednesday that U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Indiana, Thomas Kirsch, has been nominated to fill Barrett’s seat.

In a release, the White House said:

Thomas Kirsch is the United States Attorney for the Northern District of Indiana, where he serves as the chief Federal law enforcement officer for the District. Before becoming United States Attorney in 2017, Mr. Kirsch was a partner at Winston & Strawn LLP, with a practice focused on complex litigation and corporate investigations and served in various positions in the Department of Justice, including as an Assistant United States Attorney in the Northern District of Indiana and as Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Policy. Mr. Kirsch served as a law clerk for Judge John Daniel Tinder of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana. He received his B.A., with highest distinction, from Indiana University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School. A Harvard Law graduate, Kirsch has also served as counsel to the Assistant Attorney General in charge of the DOJ’s Office of Legal Policy. He also has experience in private practice as a partner at a major law firm where he handled complex litigation.

According to Powerline Blog, Republicans have the votes to confirm Kirsch and plenty of time to so. “Barring unforeseen developments, Kirsch will be confirmed by the end of the year,” writes Paul Mirengoff.

A WHOPPING 56% of Americans Say They are Better off Today (Mid-Pandemic) than Under Obama-Biden


A recent Gallup survey found that a whopping 56 percent of Americans say they are better off now under President Trump–in the middle of a pandemic–than they were four years ago when President Obama was in office.

Gallup writes:

During his presidential campaign in 1980, Ronald Reagan asked Americans, “Are you better off today than you were four years ago?” Since then, this question has served as a key standard that sitting presidents running for reelection have been held to.

Gallup’s most recent survey found a clear majority of registered voters (56%) saying they are better off now than they were four years ago, while 32% said they are worse off.

Gallup compared the 56 percent number to 2012, during the Obama-Biden Administration when just 45 percent of Americans could say they felt they were better off. In 2004, 47 percent of Americans said they were better off and in 1992, that number was at 38 percent.

President Trump responded to the news, writing on Twitter, “The Gallup Poll has just come out with the incredible finding that 56% of you say that you are better off today, during a pandemic, than you were four years ago (Biden). The highest number on record! Pretty amazing!”

BIDEN: 56 Percent of Americans “Probably Shouldn’t” Vote for Me


Vice President Joe Biden said that Americans who say they are better off now, under President Trump than they were four years ago under the Obama Administration, shouldn’t vote for him.

The hilarious comment was made when he was asked his opinion of a recent survey that found that 56 percent of Americans said they were better off now than four years ago.

Biden was asked, “Gallup reported last week 56 percent of Americans said they were better off today than they were 4 years ago, [that] would have been under the Obama-Biden administration. So why should people who feel they are better off today under the Trump administration vote for you?”

Biden replied, Well, if they think that, they probably shouldn’t.”

He then incorrectly stated the percentage that was just referenced to him and said, “They think — 54 percent of the American people believe they’re better off economically today than they were under our administration? Well, their memory is not very good, quite frankly.”

 

Last week we reported on the news of the Gallup poll which found just 32 percent of Americans said they were worse off now than under the Obama Administration.

These numbers are particularly astounding considering the United States is in the middle of a pandemic.

This wasn’t Biden’s only gaffe this week. In a surprising twist, he actually took questions from reporters yesterday (only briefly, of course) and forgot Sen. Mitt Romney’s name.

When asked about judge Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court and whether or not her faith should be factored into consideration, Biden said, “You may remember, I got in trouble when we were running against the senator who was a Mormon, the governor, OK? And I took him on. No one’s faith should be questioned.”

 

Later on that day during his speech, Biden also said he was running for the U.S. Senate: “You know, we have to come together. That’s why I’m running. I’m running as a proud Democrat for the Senate,” he said. “When I ran as a proud Democrat for vice president, and I’m running as a proud Democrat for president. But I promise you this, I will govern as an American president.”

 


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